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Corporate welfare for the car industry

#61 User is offline   Trogdor 

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Posted 23 May 2013 - 03:21 PM

View PostRoderick, on 23 May 2013 - 01:37 PM, said:

The sooner that these companies, that bludge on the Australian taxpayers, shut up shop and go elsewhere the better.


I’ll never understand why people claim this when it comes to car companies, but never any other companies. Can we include the following in your statement:-
  • Mining Companies
  • Farmers
  • Child care centres
  • Real estate agents and real estate developers, various parts of the building industry
  • Tollroad operators
  • Small business
  • Private schools and universities
  • Defence industry

…and that’s just for starters
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#62 User is offline   BOOBOO 

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Posted 23 May 2013 - 04:38 PM

Would the last person out of Geelong please get the lights!
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#63 User is offline   Roderick 

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Posted 23 May 2013 - 04:59 PM

View PostTrogdor, on 23 May 2013 - 03:21 PM, said:

I’ll never understand why people claim this when it comes to car companies, but never any other companies. Can we include the following in your statement:-
  • Mining Companies
  • Farmers
  • Child care centres
  • Real estate agents and real estate developers, various parts of the building industry
  • Tollroad operators
  • Small business
  • Private schools and universities
  • Defence industry

…and that’s just for starters

No, we can't because each of those examples produce something that is needed, the Ford Motor Company doesn't, that's why its products aren't selling as well as they did formerly.

The Australian motoring public is slowly waking up to what it means to get value for its motoring dollar and to what is a reasonably good car.
Overseas manufacturers know what the market wants and their sales have gone up accordingly.

Our second car is a Daewoo "Matiz", 796cc, 3 cylinder in-line engine with non-wheel-spinning power.
None the less it has bags of interior space, excellent headroom, will achieve 55 mpg and one can exceed the speed limit if not careful as it has a top speed of 140kph (this does not apply on hills although if driven vigourously it stays near the 100 kph.

Our's now has 260,000+ kms on the odo and will still slow up on compresion in 4th gear.

Value for money.
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#64 User is offline   Bam 

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Posted 24 May 2013 - 02:52 PM

PM Julia Gillard rejects calls to raise import tariffs

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Prime Minister Julia Gillard has stared down backbench calls for an increase in tariffs on imported cars in the wake of Ford's decision to shut down its Australian plants.

Labor backbenchers Darren Cheeseman, Nick Champion and Doug Cameron say an emergency increase is needed to save the domestic car industry.

Australia currently has a 5 per cent tariff on imported cars and Ms Gillard says it will not be going any higher.
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#65 User is offline   scotto 

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Posted 25 May 2013 - 07:59 AM

View PostTrogdor, on 23 May 2013 - 03:21 PM, said:

I’ll never understand why people claim this when it comes to car companies, but never any other companies. Can we include the following in your statement:-
  • Mining Companies
  • Farmers
  • Child care centres
  • Real estate agents and real estate developers, various parts of the building industry
  • Tollroad operators
  • Small business
  • Private schools and universities
  • Defence industry

…and that’s just for starters


I'm all for that.

I guess at the same time we should make a more concerted attack on the countries that support their car industries more heavily than us, for a start. Outside car industries, there is much that needs to change as well. I'm given to understand for example that India prohibits any foreign supermarket chain from operating there.
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#66 User is offline   Trogdor 

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 11:31 AM

View PostRoderick, on 23 May 2013 - 04:59 PM, said:

No, we can't because each of those examples produce something that is needed, the Ford Motor Company doesn't, that's why its products aren't selling as well as they did formerly.


But again I'd ask - why do we apply an argument to the car industry that we dont apply alsewhere? If Fruit Farmers aren't selling as much as they used to because imported fruit is selling better (thanks to other countries subsidising producers as often happens) should we just withdraw support and let the market decide?


View PostRoderick, on 23 May 2013 - 04:59 PM, said:

The Australian motoring public is slowly waking up to what it means to get value for its motoring dollar and to what is a reasonably good car.
Overseas manufacturers know what the market wants and their sales have gone up accordingly.


It hasn't helped that we continue to allow imports into our market (for what consumers want) but aren't afforded the same in return. For example, the FTA with Thailand allows Thai cars to be dumped onto our market tariff-free, but guess what happened when Ford tried to export the Territory back to them - hit with a 50% duty.

View PostRoderick, on 23 May 2013 - 04:59 PM, said:

Our second car is a Daewoo "Matiz", 796cc, 3 cylinder in-line engine with non-wheel-spinning power.



My condolences :)

Though perhaps if we had supported our car industry with the vigour that the Koreans did, we might be in a better position today...
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#67 User is offline   Trogdor 

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 11:42 AM

View Postscotto, on 25 May 2013 - 07:59 AM, said:

I'm all for that.

I guess at the same time we should make a more concerted attack on the countries that support their car industries more heavily than us, for a start.


Which is pretty much all of them. And even the current rate doesn't take into account that fact that these countries used a network of tariffs and subsidies to expand their industry during the 70s, 80s and 90s, while exporting to our market which was reducing tariffs.

For example, Roderick's Daewoo is from Korea, a country that not only used tariffs and subsidies to prop up its car industry, but actively discouraged people from owning foreign cars by having the tax department conduct random tax audits on "wealthy individuals". And guess how those "wealthy individuals' were chosen - why, they owned a foreign car, of course.
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#68 User is offline   Roderick 

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 03:22 PM

View PostTrogdor, on 27 May 2013 - 11:31 AM, said:

.....Though perhaps if we had supported our car industry with the vigour that the Koreans did, we might be in a better position today...

We were supporting GMH when our other car was made, a Statesman.

It is a superb highway car (but not on the twisty curve infested Gwydir Highway on the section between Glen Innes and Grafton, I can do the trip quicker in the Matiz because it handles much better on the bends.

Not only that but I can get into it without having to resort to contortions, with the seat adjusted to a comfortable driving position I cannot get into the Statesman without twisting my head sideways and sliding as far as possible across the seat.
When Holden built the more upmarket Callais they raised the roofline some 3 inches.

Frankly what the Koreans do doesn't interest me if they make a car that I can get my modest 5 foof 8 inch frame into without cricking my neck.

Had it not been for a girl having an argument with her boy friend and rear ending my 1978 Renault 12 whilst I was stationary at a school crossing, I would still be driving it, superb roadholding and a car meant to be driven and enjoyed.

Australia has yet to produce a real driver's car, apart from some specialist builders.
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