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Real Conservationists

#1 User is offline   Roderick 

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 07:10 AM

0750 hrs and just back from another successful foray after the fox.
Only got one dog but he won't be fertilizing anything from now on except a spot between the rocks where I dumped him after skinning; not a bad pelt either, only small holes from No 4 shot.

First time I've had this particular gun out for a while.
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Now off to a well earned breakfast having done my bit, for today, for the environment in general and the small natives in particular.
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#2 User is offline   Roderick 

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Posted 05 July 2012 - 06:26 AM

Was just reminded about Dr John Walmsley, the great conservationist, and his huge impact on conservation in Australia.
Here's a post on him from a bow-hunter forum:

Quote

Dr John Walmsley-the original anti-Green conservationist

For those who never heard of him, a bit of an old article about an Aussie legend who didn't just talk about conservation over machiattios and lattes in Paddington or Toorak before voting Green once every 3 years, but put his money where his mouth was, a dead cat where his head was, got out there, fenced off huge tracts of land, eradicated ferals and bred back endangered native fauna successfully.

As the article points out, so called "animal liberationists" took him to court for shooting feral cats within his sanctuary, the result being, he wore a skinned cat as a hat and the ensuing publicity had the laws changed so we could all enjoy ridding the continent of cats

Retired now, but I reckon he would have welcomed bowhunters anyday.

http://www.abc.net.a...5/s1330004.htm]

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My link
See also This link
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#3 User is offline   Roderick 

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Posted 05 July 2012 - 09:08 AM

Quote

Roos at home on the range
03 Jul 2012
John Robinson, GUNS Editor
Pistol shooters are definitely conservationists, and here’s some evidence. I took this photo last Sunday morning at the ACT Big Bore Silhouette championships at the Majura range in Canberra.
We were shooting at the time – the only scores counted are on the steel targets, as the ’roos are well aware. There are often over 100 there of a morning.
So much for the fears raised by the Greens for our native wildlife in NSW national parks.

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Range
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#4 User is offline   Roderick 

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Posted 05 July 2012 - 10:01 AM

From the National Geographic:

Quote

. . . . The great irony is that many species might not survive at all were it not for hunters trying to kill them. All the wings provided to Norman Saake and his colleagues throughout the country come from hunters, who fold them into prepaid envelopes, record the date and place of harvest, and mail them in. It is but one example of how the nation’s 12.5 million hunters have become essential partners in wildlife management. They have paid more than 700 million dollars for duck stamps, which have added 5.2 million acres to the National Wildlife Refuge System since 1934, when the first stamps were issued. They pay millions of dollars for licenses, tags, and permits each year, which helps finance state game agencies. They contribute more than 250 million dollars annually in excise taxes on guns, ammunition, and other equipment, which largely pays for new public game lands. Hunters in the private sector also play a growing role in conserving wildlife. . . . .


Conservation

See also (local)
NSW Conservation
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#5 User is offline   Roderick 

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Posted 06 July 2012 - 06:33 AM

Conservation in action:

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Quote

Evening guys,
Got my first fox just two hours ago!
Decided to go for a walk, took the rifle with me, when I got to an old station wagon we've got sitting up there I chucked the bipod over it and just started scanning the paddock/field for anything. And what do you know I see this long arsed lanky dog trotting along one of the contour banks. Lined him up and waited for my opportunity, turned his head away from me to some roo's in the background and pop, clean headshot. Hit the ground like a sack of potatoes. The shot was around 250 yards. Personally I'm stoked Here's some piccies


from a post on Good Fox
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#6 User is offline   Roderick 

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Posted 07 July 2012 - 07:26 AM

Mate and I got three foxes this morning, out at 5:00AM, temp: -7C.
He got two an' I got the other, all vixens. 1000+ fauna saved.
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#7 User is offline   Bam 

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Posted 07 July 2012 - 09:57 AM

Merged another very similar topic from the "State Politics" section into this topic.

BAM

EDIT: Also moved topic to General Discussion.
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#8 User is offline   scotto 

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Posted 08 July 2012 - 05:18 AM

All this discussion seems to be ignoring the fact that lots of shooter go after kangaroos.
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#9 User is offline   Roderick 

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Posted 08 July 2012 - 06:59 AM

View Postscotto, on 08 July 2012 - 05:18 AM, said:

All this discussion seems to be ignoring the fact that lots of shooter go after kangaroos.


Mainly those engaged in the kangaroo food industry; the average shooter out hunting ignores them as they are illegal to shoot and provide no challenge as they have little fear of man and unlike wild dogs, cats and foxes do not seem to develope much fear of danger.
In comparison with dogs etc., in this regard, they appear to be quite stupid.

Not that thinning out the 'roos isn't a bad thing for the country and their meat is an export earner, there are now estimated to be more 'roos around than at any time in Australia's history.
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#10 User is offline   scotto 

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Posted 09 July 2012 - 08:41 AM

yeah but it's all just shooting, isn't it? Shooter do not set out to help the environement.
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#11 User is offline   Roderick 

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Posted 09 July 2012 - 02:24 PM

View Postscotto, on 09 July 2012 - 08:41 AM, said:

yeah but it's all just shooting, isn't it? Shooter do not set out to help the environement.

Very many shooters do, especially those that hunt feral animal pests; they don't do it for the money as there is nothing in skins. Hunters do a lot for the environment.
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#12 User is offline   Frogman 

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Posted 09 July 2012 - 02:34 PM

View PostRoderick, on 09 July 2012 - 02:24 PM, said:

Hunters do a lot for the environment.

Citation needed.
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#13 User is offline   Roderick 

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Posted 09 July 2012 - 03:18 PM

View PostFrogman, on 09 July 2012 - 02:34 PM, said:

Citation needed.

Happy to oblige SSAA SA H&C

Quote

THE STORY SO FAR.

The first activity was undertaken in early 1992 in the Vulkathunha-Gammon Ranges National Park under very close scrutiny of National Parks and Wildlife staff.

The H&C Branch has been active since then, achieving a high level of recognition, not only as an effective wildlife management “tool”, but also as a source of specimens and empirical data for research purposes.

The success of our Accreditation process and safe operations in the field, has made it possible to have $20M Public Liability and Travel Insurance covers for our Accredited members undertaking H&C Branch approved activities.

This organization has been accepted for membership of a number of conservation interest related bodies, and has representation on a number of Government and community consultative and advisory committees.

The H&C Branch is committed to conservation. It has established, and its members constitute the majority of the membership of the Yellow Footed Rock Wallaby Preservation Association Inc., which, with Commonwealth Government funding assistance, has purchased 140km2 of mountain range adjoining the Flinders Ranges National Park, to create the Bunkers Conservation Reserve for the protection of remnant colonies of this species.

Major projects undertaken include substantial and continuing involvement in:

- “Bounceback” project in the Flinders Ranges and other National Parks (Banksia Foundation National Award winner).

- PESTCAM project in the Bookmark Biosphere,

- Flinders Feral Predator Program,

- Narrung Peninsula Pest Eradication project,

- Forestry SA, NP&W, Local Government, Australian Wildlife Conservancy, Australian Landscape Trust, Birds Australia, Bush Heritage Australia, Nature Foundation SA Inc, Conservation Volunteers Australia, Friends of Parks Inc and private property and conservation reserves pest control activities.

- University of Adelaide and University of SA undergraduate and postgraduate research projects.

- Department of Environment and Natural Resources research and conservation projects.

Activities have involved the removal of feral herbivores ranging from rabbits to camels, including some 35,000 goats, to reduce grazing pressures, and mainly cats and foxes to minimise feral predation of native species.

Our success has resulted from safely and effectively achieving objectives that are shared with our clients through sound training of our members, and careful organization and monitoring of our activities in the field.

To provide general information to members and the community, a website – www.hunt-cons.asn.au has been established.


'H&C' is Hunting and Conservation.
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#14 User is offline   Frogman 

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Posted 09 July 2012 - 03:21 PM

See, thats not so hard now is it?
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#15 User is offline   Roderick 

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Posted 09 July 2012 - 03:27 PM

View PostFrogman, on 09 July 2012 - 03:21 PM, said:

See, thats not so hard now is it?

Of course it isn't, here's anothery Conservation
and read my posts above, remember every fox killed potentially results in the saving of native animals.
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#16 User is offline   Roderick 

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Posted 09 July 2012 - 03:32 PM

Field and Game Organizations.

F&G

From the site.

Quote

Field and Game Australia was established in 1958 by hunters in Victoria who were extremely concerned with the amount of wetland and other natural habitat being destroyed by agricultural, industrial and residential activities.

More than 50 years on, FGA is still a leading force in wetland conservation in Australia.

When we say “get involved” we really mean “get results for your effort and investment.”

Every FGA Branch undertakes conservation projects in and around their home base. Every member of FGA supports conservation activities individually or through their Branch.

You don’t have to be a member to support wetland restoration projects undertaken by FGA.

The Wetlands Environmental Taskforce (Public Fund) is a registered environmental charity established by FGA to provide everyone with a way to support real and innovative wetland projects. It also partners with other organisations to achieve outcomes for all members of our communities.


Supporting the WET Trust

You Personally may:

Make a 100% tax deductable donation to the trust.
Make a targeted donation for the purchase and restoration of lands in the Heart Morass.
Donate to the WET trust through a bequest or other provision in your will.
Donate firearms or other shooting equipment which will be converted into wetland conservation assets.
Purchase any item from the FGA Store that carries the note “all profits go to the WET Public Fund.”
Host a fund raising event within your community to support WET Trust projects.
Join FGA and work with your branch to make conservation projects happen in your area.

Your Business may:

Donate trading stock from your business which will be converted into wetland conservation assets – this also attracts a 100% tax deduction.
Engage your staff, suppliers and customers in a wetlands project promoting your business support for the WET Trust.
Make a 100% tax deductable donation to the trust.
Make a targeted donation for the purchase and restoration of lands in the Heart Morass. Purchase any item from the FGA Store that carries the note “all profits go to the WET Public Fund.”
Your Club or Community Organisation may:

Partner with the WET Trust to raise funds for wetland purchase and conservation.
Partner with an FGA Branch to undertaken on-site projects ranging from fencing and cleanup work to tree planting and education days.
. . . . .
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#17 User is offline   Roderick 

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Posted 09 July 2012 - 03:44 PM

All and sundry might also look at

Conservators

Quote

Ferals, conservation and the shooter

by Ric Tester

Ric Tester is active in several shooting disciplines and is a keen conservationist. He is a member of WIRES (Wildlife Injuries and Rescue Information Service) and is an authority on Australian freshwater turtles.

Some animal welfare groups and animal liberationist have, and do, hold shooters in contempt, citing their activities as cruel and detrimental to the environment. This misconception has resulted in much confusion and debate in the broader community, often resulting in viewpoints based upon perceptions, the ethics of which have not been fully clarified or unpacked. This article deals with the environmental issues that have arisen as a consequence of our ‘feral problem’ and the very useful role that the recreational shooter can play in the whole drama. In order to gain a full appreciation of the problem, it is necessary to understand the nature, behaviour and impact of our most serious feral pests.

The European red fox
Almost 150 years ago, a small number of European red foxes were released into the bush near Melbourne. Well suited to the environment and with a copious food supply consisting mainly of small native mammals and large quantities of native reptile eggs, the population flourished and by the turn of the century had spread to all states with the exception of Tasmania. Before federation, the fox had officially been declared a pest in Victoria and NSW. Today, this vermin infests most of mainland Australia - perhaps with the exception of the tropical far north, the climate of which appears to be unfavourable to the animal. Foxes have successfully adapted to most habitats, including urban areas, but are most abundant in light to medium wooded areas and agricultural regions, where a food supply is most accessible.

Research has shown the fox to be one of Australia’s most successful and destructive introduced species. The sharp decline in populations of the Murray River turtle in NSW has been attributed almost exclusively to the fact that between 90 and 95 per cent of freshly laid eggs are consumed by marauding foxes. Mammals such as the numbat and the black flanked rock wallaby are running the risk of becoming extinct as a direct consequence of fox predation. The economic impact of the fox is substantial, as it preys on newborn lambs and goat kids. It is also a potential carrier of the disease rabies, which if ever introduced would be very difficult to manage.

At present, control is affected by placing poisoned baits (using poison 1080), trapping and shooting. Regrettably, placing baits can result in the inadvertent poisoning of non-target species.
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#18 User is offline   Roderick 

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Posted 09 July 2012 - 05:54 PM

Impact

Quote

Native species at risk from foxes
The following list, although far from comprehensive, provides an indication of species believed to be at risk from fox predation across Australia.
MARSUPIALS
Parantechinus apicalis, dibbler
Dasycercus cristicauda, mulgara
Dasyuroides byrnei, kowari
Phascogale calura, red-tailed phascogale
Sminthopsis psammophila, sandhill dunnart
Myrmecobius fasciatus, numbat
Isoodon obesulus, southern brown bandicoot
Perameles gunnii, eastern barred bandicoot
Macrotis lagotis, bilby
Burramys parvus, mountain pygmy possum
Pseudocheirus occidentalis, western ring-tail possum
Dasyurus geoffroii, western quoll
Potorous longipes, long-footed potoroo
Bettongia penicillata, brush-tailed bettong
Lagorchestes conspicillatus, spectacled hare-wallaby
Lagorchestes hirsutus, rufous hare-tailed wallaby
Petrogale lateralis, black-footed rock-wallaby
Petrogale penicillata, brush-tailed rock-wallaby
Petrogale xanthopus, yellow-footed rock-wallaby
RODENTS
Pseudomys australis, plains rat
Pseudomys shortridgei, heath eat
Notomys fuscus, dusky hopping mouse
Zyzomys pedunculatus, central rock-rat
BIRDS
Pezoporus wallicus, ground parrot
Geopsittacus occidentalis, night parrot
Leipoa ocellata, malleefowl
Burhinus magnirostris, bush thick-knee
Cinclosoma alisteri, nullarbor quail-thrush
Sterna albifrons, little tern
Eudyptula minor, little penguin

Saunders, G., Coman, B., Kinnear, J.& Brayser, M. (1995). Managing Vertebrate Pests: Foxes, Bureau of Resource Sciences, AGPS.
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#19 User is offline   Roderick 

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Posted 10 July 2012 - 07:40 AM

Meanwhile, down in The Island State, from The Mercury

Quote

Island's wildlife set for cull
MATT SMITH | July 09, 2012 12.01am
Posted Image
File photo. Maria Island wallaby.

SHOOTERS will converge on tourist jewel Maria Island on Sunday as they spend a week culling hundreds of wallabies, kangaroos and pademelons from the National Park.

The island, which has been a big tourism award winner in recent years for its world-renowned Maria Island Walk, will be closed to the public for the week.

Tasmania's Parks and Wildlife Service is aiming to cull about 700 Forester kangaroos, Bennetts wallabies and Tasmanian pademelons during a week-long hunt.

The annual cull has attracted criticism in the past from animal rights activists, who have called for the Parks and Wildlife Service to find an alternative to shooting the animals.

Against Animal Cruelty spokesman Chris Simcox said yesterday there were concerns animals were not being killed cleanly and therefore left to suffer.

"We think there has to be a better approach," Mr Simcox said.

He said independent observers had overseen the annual cull in the past and expressed horror at the number of animals left maimed.

Mr Simcox said there were concerns joeys were being neglected after mothers had been shot.

This year's cull comes when the introduction of an extra ferry service and the attraction of the Maria Island Walk are seeing visitors flock back to the island.

Visitor figures for last financial year were expected to hit the 10,000 mark for the first time in nearly a decade.

Parks and Wildlife Service Southern Region operations manager Shane Breen said the service had a responsibility to manage the island in a way that conserved its biodiversity, while also maintaining a viable and healthy animal population.

"Population control on Maria is an animal welfare issue," he said.

"When the macropod populations are too high, animals become sick and distressed."

Tasmanian Conservation Trust director Peter McGlone said last year's cull had been an improvement.

"But you need to do it well every time. There was some really sloppy work done in the past," he said.

Mr McGlone said the introduction of Tasmanian devils to the island could mean this year's macropod cull would be the last.

"The devils will do the culling. There may be some need for individualised localised culls near Darlington," he said.

Mr Simcox said past attempts by Against Animal Cruelty to discuss the issue with the PWS had come to nothing.

"We have tried to talk to them but they keep a closed shop," he said.

"There has to be a better long-term solution to this."

smithmat@news.net.au


What would be a better solution?
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#20 User is offline   Frogman 

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Posted 10 July 2012 - 08:39 AM

View PostRoderick, on 10 July 2012 - 07:40 AM, said:

Meanwhile, down in The Island State, from The Mercury


What would be a better solution?


Do you read the stuff you post? Its got a solution right there. You have already said the solution.

Quote


Mr McGlone said the introduction of Tasmanian devils to the island could mean this year's macropod cull would be the last.

"The devils will do the culling. There may be some need for individualised localised culls near Darlington," he said.

Now, understandably, you cant just go throwing tassie devils everywhere and assume they will pick up the slack, but if you encourage the native predators, then they will do their job, and people wont be in danger of getting shot when walking in a national park.
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