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Road Safety

#1 User is offline   Roderick 

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 01:48 PM

What makes people drive with their headlights on during the day?

One understands that it is a safety measure in poor light conditions but why have them on when the sun is shining brightly?

I consider it a stupid and potentially dangerous practice.
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#2 User is offline   NotFrogman 

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 01:53 PM

Because its easier to see cars in the distance if they have their lights on. This is good for country driving.

Why do you think this is stupid and potentially dangerous? I mean, apart from the obvious hazard of having light enter your eyes.
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#3 User is offline   HDMC 

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 02:50 PM

Our car is silver and under certain low light conditions I reckon it would blend into the background. But it has those LED running lights which come on as soon as you start it.

My ute is white and I rarely use lights during the day because it's pretty easy to spot.

Horses for courses.

(Except for those dickheads who run around on high beam - they should be charged)
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#4 User is offline   scotto 

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 02:57 PM

View PostRoderick, on 20 September 2012 - 01:48 PM, said:

What makes people drive with their headlights on during the day?

One understands that it is a safety measure in poor light conditions but why have them on when the sun is shining brightly?

I consider it a stupid and potentially dangerous practice.

Perhaps they are shooters.
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#5 User is offline   Roderick 

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 04:27 PM

View PostNotFrogman, on 20 September 2012 - 01:53 PM, said:

Because its easier to see cars in the distance if they have their lights on. This is good for country driving.

Why do you think this is stupid and potentially dangerous? I mean, apart from the obvious hazard of having light enter your eyes.


Some of them drive on high beam and that affects the eyes, in daylight or darkness.
Head lights shining in your central rear vision mirror can be a real hazard, so one puts the mirror to night setting and the problem is solved temporarily, then one has to remember to put it back to day vision when the offensive fool eventually passes.

So far I have resisted the temptation to give them a dose of their own medicine when they pass.

Way back around 1970 driving in the day with lights was touted as a safety measure and one long weekend motorists were encouraged to drive with their headlights on during the day, there were a record number of accidents that weekend.
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#6 User is offline   Bam 

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 11:19 PM

View PostRoderick, on 20 September 2012 - 01:48 PM, said:

What makes people drive with their headlights on during the day?

High beam or low beam? I suspect that you mean high beam because low beam in daylight doesn't actually do much.
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#7 User is offline   Roderick 

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Posted 21 September 2012 - 07:51 AM

View PostBam, on 20 September 2012 - 11:19 PM, said:

High beam or low beam? I suspect that you mean high beam because low beam in daylight doesn't actually do much.

All beams; even low beam in the rear view mirror is distracting and just what is the point of it?
If other motorists cannot see another vehicle during bright sunlight or other conditions of good visibility then there is a need for much more stringent eyesight tests.
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#8 User is offline   scotto 

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Posted 21 September 2012 - 07:54 AM

View PostRoderick, on 21 September 2012 - 07:51 AM, said:

All beams; even low beam in the rear view mirror is distracting and just what is the point of it?
If other motorists cannot see another vehicle during bright sunlight or other conditions of good visibility then there is a need for much more stringent eyesight tests.

I don't think that's correct. In the summer for example it's hard to see some cars, even when they get surprisingly close, due to heat shimmer.
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#9 User is offline   Roderick 

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Posted 21 September 2012 - 11:05 AM

View Postscotto, on 21 September 2012 - 07:54 AM, said:

I don't think that's correct. In the summer for example it's hard to see some cars, even when they get surprisingly close, due to heat shimmer.
Then I would suggest that some of the enormous amount of money that is collected in fines be spent on research to see why this is so, and then pass some regulations on car colours.
Other countries and some with less sunlight than we enjoy do not encourage headlights on during the day, except in special circumstances.

It was the practice in Australia for the cars in a funeral procession to have their lights on, then as the cars passed through an intersection etc., other motorists would give way to them; nowadays there could be some confusion.
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#10 User is offline   scotto 

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Posted 21 September 2012 - 11:12 AM

View PostRoderick, on 21 September 2012 - 11:05 AM, said:

Then I would suggest that some of the enormous amount of money that is collected in fines be spent on research to see why this is so, and then pass some regulations on car colours.
Other countries and some with less sunlight than we enjoy do not encourage headlights on during the day, except in special circumstances.

It was the practice in Australia for the cars in a funeral procession to have their lights on, then as the cars passed through an intersection etc., other motorists would give way to them; nowadays there could be some confusion.

Or..... we could just put out low beams on, at those times.
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#11 User is offline   Bam 

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Posted 21 September 2012 - 02:00 PM

View PostRoderick, on 21 September 2012 - 11:05 AM, said:

Then I would suggest that some of the enormous amount of money that is collected in fines be spent on research to see why this is so, and then pass some regulations on car colours.

Or we could pass laws that require anyone who is driving a road-coloured car (black or dark grey) has headlights on low beam at all times to improve visibility, with fines for noncompliance.

Ten years later these menaces will be scarce...
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#12 User is offline   Bam 

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Posted 21 September 2012 - 02:04 PM

View PostRoderick, on 20 September 2012 - 01:48 PM, said:

What makes people drive with their headlights on during the day?

One understands that it is a safety measure in poor light conditions but why have them on when the sun is shining brightly?

I consider it a stupid and potentially dangerous practice.

In Victoria, a learner driver who is currently undertaking a drive test for their licence is required to have the headlights on low beam for the duration of the test.
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#13 User is offline   Roderick 

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Posted 21 September 2012 - 02:34 PM

View PostBam, on 21 September 2012 - 02:04 PM, said:

In Victoria, a learner driver who is currently undertaking a drive test for their licence is required to have the headlights on low beam for the duration of the test.

The madness is spreading!!
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#14 User is offline   scotto 

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Posted 21 September 2012 - 03:41 PM

View PostRoderick, on 21 September 2012 - 02:34 PM, said:

The madness is spreading!!

I'mnot sure about Australia, but many other countries require motorcycles to have headlights on all the time - in fact you can't buy a motorbike that doesn't have automatically turning-on headlights in some countries. I notice that in Australia some imports seem to have this feature.
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#15 User is offline   icey 

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Posted 21 September 2012 - 05:37 PM

View Postscotto, on 21 September 2012 - 03:41 PM, said:

I'mnot sure about Australia, but many other countries require motorcycles to have headlights on all the time - in fact you can't buy a motorbike that doesn't have automatically turning-on headlights in some countries. I notice that in Australia some imports seem to have this feature.


I've ridden motorbikes since I was around 16 years old. "Headlights on" is touted as a safety factor by increasing car driver awareness of a rider's presence. It has always had an air of common sense plausibility even in the absence of a nanny telling me I had to do it.

Quote

Some motorcycling advocacy groups are concerned over the potential for reduced motorcycle conspicuity with the introduction of headlamp-based DRLs on cars and other dual-track vehicles, since it means motorcycles are no longer the only vehicles displaying headlamps during the day.


Wiki
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#16 User is offline   Roderick 

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Posted 21 September 2012 - 06:56 PM

View Posticey, on 21 September 2012 - 05:37 PM, said:

I've ridden motorbikes since I was around 16 years old. "Headlights on" is touted as a safety factor by increasing car driver awareness of a rider's presence. It has always had an air of common sense plausibility even in the absence of a nanny telling me I had to do it.



Wiki

I've never had any problems with motor cycles having their headlights on as I can imagine that they are sometimes hard to see, but then I am constantly scanning the road ahead and to both sides; I guess its the hunter in me and I don't want to hit a 'roo or a wallaby or worse still a cow or a deer.
In 60 years of driving I've only once hit an animal, a
'roo and that was a joey that jumped out from a roadside drain. His mum and her mates were having an afternoon siesta on a blind curve on Rockley Mount (near Bathurst), fortunately for both me and the joey I'd almost stopped and he was not hurt; I saw the mob again the next day and there was one joey with some skin missing but hopping around and seemingly QK, (as was the car).

There is a danger at night that a car with one headlight may be mistaken for a motor cycle especially if it is the right hand one that's out.; it's not uncommon to see this.
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#17 User is offline   Roderick 

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 08:22 AM

New England Highmay and a side street intersection, Glen Innes, NSW.

Posted Image

The photographer's car is positioned at the line waiting to cross the highway.
Just where the line of the glass of the partly opened window intersects the top of the hedge there is a smudge of blue, it's the top of a small sedan; an open car would be completely obscured. (Note that it is also spider season :rolleyes: ).
The hedge has just had its spring trim, imagine what it's like when the council gets around to trimming it again.
The speed limit on this section is 60.
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#18 User is offline   Bam 

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 01:56 PM

View PostRoderick, on 14 November 2012 - 08:22 AM, said:

New England Highmay and a side street intersection, Glen Innes, NSW.

Posted Image

The photographer's car is positioned at the line waiting to cross the highway.
Just where the line of the glass of the partly opened window intersects the top of the hedge there is a smudge of blue, it's the top of a small sedan; an open car would be completely obscured. (Note that it is also spider season :rolleyes: ).
The hedge has just had its spring trim, imagine what it's like when the council gets around to trimming it again.
The speed limit on this section is 60.

I had to look carefully. Yes, this is really bad and shows a lack of clear thinking on the part of the council or the road authority. What were they thinking when they decided to plant a hedge on the median of a divided road?

A similar issue are shrubs and hedges planted in the middle of roundabouts.
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#19 User is offline   NotFrogman 

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 02:31 PM

This one time I saw a road that wasn't clearly marked with the speed limit so I went 100kph.
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#20 User is offline   NotFrogman 

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 02:34 PM

Also there was this stop sign but when I stopped no one went past so now I don't bother stopping
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